Saturday, October 19, 2019

Carmens Aria A song of Celebration and Self-Realization Essay

Carmens Aria A song of Celebration and Self-Realization - Essay Example The aria explores love from an independent ladies perspective who lives life without any constraint of chasteness or fidelity. It explores the hidden desires in every human mind to lead a similar life. In a poetical sense, Bizet wanted to create a lead character much different from the classical opera heroines of Europe. He specifically used the Habanera music to create an air of mystery and foreignism around the Carmen character. The libretto occurs when Carmen is asked by a group of men whom she will choose as her lover. Carmen expresses her desire to keep her choice open forever through the area. She talks about herself and about her attitude towards love in general. She is exotic, free as a bird and declares her love has no boundaries and cannot be tamed. She warns any men whom she might fall in love with about her indecisive attitude. Carmen neither wants to please any man nor be attached to him for a long time. Her love is like a bird which keeps escaping the boundaries constantly. Bizet hailed Carmen came from a far-off land to justify her exotic nature. The verses of the libretto create ideas related to the theme of naturalism. Carmen is a working-class girl who does not respect much of the middle-class values related to fidelity. Bizet portrays the working class women as strong and sexually demanding who are ready to socialize, free to travel and capable of fighting for themselves. Carmen says her love is like a bird, a rebellious one that nobody can ever win over in the very first line. She concludes the final line of the aria by saying her love will never be bound by any known law. The second stanza of the aria portrays Carmen's choice and taste of men. She prefers a silent mum man than the one who talks constantly. Women are often said to love humorous and talkative men, capable of praising their beauty and virtue.  

Friday, October 18, 2019

Friedrich Nietzsche Morals Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Friedrich Nietzsche Morals - Essay Example His radical moral philosophy has been a probing topic of analysis in philosophy and there have been several articles dealing with his moral philosophy. There have also been several significant attempts to associate his moral philosophy with other distinctive areas of knowledge including science, epistemology, ethics, and literature. One such critical approach has observed Nietzsche as a bridge between nineteenth-century atomistic science and process philosophy in twentieth-century physics, literature and ethics. Friedrich Ulfers and Mark Daniel Cohen, in their important article, 'Friedrich Nietzsche as Bridge from Nineteenth-Century Atomistic Science to Process Philosophy in Twentieth-Century Physics, Literature and Ethics,' attempt to establish that philosophy has its root in science and Nietzsche's moral philosophy illustrate this point. The major thesis of their article is that "the late nineteenth-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche established a philosophy rooted in science and succeeded in laying the foundation for a system of values capable of generating alternate forms of cultural expression--many of which have come to fruition in our own time, many of which have yet to be achieved. In particular, his philosophy, beginning in science, is capable of setting standards for and structuring radical formations in epistemology, ethics, and literature." (Ulfers and Cohen, 21) This paper undertakes an analysis of the article by Ulfers and Cohen in order to comprehend the major arguments of the authors and to respond to them with careful reasoning. Introducing their major arguments, Ulfers and Cohen mention that distinctive emergence of philosophy, art, literature, and science or 'the signal moments of culture' in our social life resulted in the systems of values and they bring about the connection between values and such essential areas of knowledge. The authors also make it explicit that there is essential relationship between science and moral values. "Even presumably objective scientific theories are barometric readings of our assumptions and implicit values. They are litmus tests of the cultural agar in which they grow--indicators of the fertility and of the active bases and acids of the ideological loam" (Ulfers and Cohen, 21) This is a major attempt by the authors to connect value system and scientific roots and they maintain that science has a distinctive connection with everything that mount from the soil. Even the natures of human beings are closely linked with sciences. It is in this background that the authors of th e article present their chief proposition that Friedrich Nietzsche established a philosophy which was rooted in science and put down the groundwork for a system of values that could produce alternate forms of cultural expression. Ulfers and Cohen stipulate that Nietzsche's philosophy started in science and it can lay down standards for and structure fundamental formations in epistemology, ethics, and literature. Therefore, the central argument of the article attempts to illustrate the connection between science and moral value system with the example of Nietzsche's philosophy. "Nietzsche was primarily an ontologist -- a philosopher of the real, a delver

Film Analysis and it's Applications Coursework

Film Analysis and it's Applications - Coursework Example Belfort divorces his loyal wife, begins using both drugs and prostitutes and is a fraudster. He commits a number of crimes as he operates his company aggressively often flaunting some existing laws that govern the operation of stock brokerage firms. The film provides an effective criticism of the society by proving the claim that â€Å"power corrupts† as the main character becomes increasingly powerful. The fact that the film is an adaption of a real life story makes it effective in representing the lives of some of the wealthiest people in the first world. Wall Street, for example, is a representation of America’s financial hub. The 0.7-mile street produces hundreds of millionaires on a yearly basis. The film provides the society with a view to the operations of the stockbrokers. This way, the film shows how the individuals generate their wealth. The film provides a systematic and equally effective criticism of the society thereby influencing the cultural values. From the rise and fall of Belfort in the film, the audience understands the importance of humility, respect, ethical business operations and obedience to the

Allocating Merit Raises Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Allocating Merit Raises - Assignment Example The raises it is noteworthy should be done on basis of merit and hence any other external biases and influences should not discern whether or not a professor gets a raise. As such, Houseman cannot get a raise simply to catch up with the others, Ricks cannot get a raise to cover for the 20,000$ loss, Matthews cannot get the loan based on his need to service his student loan and acquire new residence, Karas cannot get a raise because he threatens to quit and Franks cannot get one because he needs to enhance a pension plan. These are worthy reasons but they are not based on merit. 1. As provided in the departments guidelines, teaching and research are considered more important than service to the University. Hence, teaching and research will take 80% of the funds provided each while service will take the remaining 20% of the total stake. The performance measures for research, teaching, and service respectively will weigh 40%, 40%, and 20% in the overall

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and Kants Perpetual Peace Research Paper

Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and Kants Perpetual Peace - Research Paper Example The people who lived stress less life had good morals and they were filled with pity, and thus they could not hurt one another (Kant et al 3). As time progressed, the man began to change. As the number of people increased, the ways in which people could satisfy meet their daily needs changed. Because of the difficulties that people began experiencing, they started seeing each other and also began living together. They called these places communities because many people created large areas and made them settlements. They also continued working but they did so by dividing work between themselves. This they called it a division of labour and it happened between small units of people which were known as families. Division of labour leads to the invention of tools and other practices such as farming that made life easier. The fact that they worked and become tired led to the need for rest (Kant et al 4). They thus recognized the need to rest and work the following day, which they called l eisure after some time doing that. During leisure, people began to talk about the comparison between one community and another and also between themselves. This comparison brought about public values that led to shame and pride when one was told to be more superior to others. In addition, a certain community was considered more powerful than others if they had more resources. This started to make people envy property and pride and contempt. The desire for one to be recognized as superior or powerful, lead to some people isolating themselves from others. Isolation made these people accumulate property of their own. Soon the society leant of private property as important resources that brought pride and fame.

The Importance Of Training And Development Of The Staff Dissertation

The Importance Of Training And Development Of The Staff - Dissertation Example actice versus simple exposure 12 2.4.4 Individual Characteristics 13 2.4.5 Background of the trainee 13 2.4.6 Learning Style 14 2.4.7 Working Environment 14 2.5 Benefits of training and development for the Organization 15 Other Benefits 17 2.6 Telecom Industry of UK 19 2.7 British Telecom 20 2.8 Training and Development of British Telecom 22 2.9 Benefits enjoyed by British Telecom 23 2.10 Vodafone 24 2.11 Training and Development of Vodafone 24 2.11.1 Learning via experience 25 2.11.2 Training and Development Programs 25 2.11.3 Other Development Opportunities 25 2.12 Budget standard for training and development 26 2.12.1 Allocating Resources 26 2.12.2 Allocating Expenses 27 2.12.3 General estimation policy 28 2.13 Evaluation of training and development 29 2.13.1 Emotional reaction 29 2.13.2 Achieved learning objectives 30 2.13.3 Behavioural Changes 30 2.13.4 Impact on Organization 32 Chapter 3: Methodology 33 3.1 Introduction 33 3.2 Research Approach 33 3.3 Research Strategy 35 3.4 R esearch Methodology 36 3.5 Data Collection and Sampling 37 3.6 Ethical consideration 38 3.7 Limitation of the study 38 Chapter 4: Results and Findings 39 4.1 Introduction 39 4.2 Findings from employees of British Telecom 40 4.3 Findings from managers of British Telecom 45 4.4 Findings from the Employees of Vodafone 48 4.5 Findings from the Managers of Vodafone 53 Chapter 5: Analysis and Conclusion 61 5.1 Analysis 61 5.2 Conclusion 62 5.3 Recommendation 64 Chapter 6: Project Management and Review 66 Review 67 Reference List 69 Appendix 76 List of Figures Fig 1: Department of the respondents................................................................................41 Fig 2: Age of the... It has been identified by many of the authors that there exist some special characteristics of HRM that help in managing organizational culture and employee commitment (Anthony, 1994; Atkinson, 1990; Sisson, 1990; Guest, 1995). The commitment and alteration in the culture are encouraged by the application of specific practices in the areas of selection and recruitment, training and development, appraisal system and encouragement in the participation of the employees. In the general literature of HRM, recruitment and selection are seen as essential elements that assist in achieving employee commitment and cultural change. Some of the significant policy areas required to achieve new culture were identified by Guest (1987). On the other hand, William, Dobson, and Walters (1993) identifies that if recruitment is conducted in a systematic and thoughtful way, it is possible to exert emphasis on the ‘incoming culture', thereby creating a strong pressure on the existing workforce withi n the organization. Moreover, in order to create a change in the culture, it becomes very important for the HR manager to recruit selective people with the desired attitude. Snape, et al. (1995) have also emphasized that in order to develop the appropriate culture within the organization, the recruitment and selection of the employees should be based on their attitudinal and behavioral characteristics. The HRM literature also suggests that the training and development of the employees also lead to the change in the culture of the organization.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and Kants Perpetual Peace Research Paper

Discourse on the Origin of Inequality and Kants Perpetual Peace - Research Paper Example The people who lived stress less life had good morals and they were filled with pity, and thus they could not hurt one another (Kant et al 3). As time progressed, the man began to change. As the number of people increased, the ways in which people could satisfy meet their daily needs changed. Because of the difficulties that people began experiencing, they started seeing each other and also began living together. They called these places communities because many people created large areas and made them settlements. They also continued working but they did so by dividing work between themselves. This they called it a division of labour and it happened between small units of people which were known as families. Division of labour leads to the invention of tools and other practices such as farming that made life easier. The fact that they worked and become tired led to the need for rest (Kant et al 4). They thus recognized the need to rest and work the following day, which they called l eisure after some time doing that. During leisure, people began to talk about the comparison between one community and another and also between themselves. This comparison brought about public values that led to shame and pride when one was told to be more superior to others. In addition, a certain community was considered more powerful than others if they had more resources. This started to make people envy property and pride and contempt. The desire for one to be recognized as superior or powerful, lead to some people isolating themselves from others. Isolation made these people accumulate property of their own. Soon the society leant of private property as important resources that brought pride and fame.